If you don’t want to match to your faucet, then think about some of the other components in your kitchen. For example, if you have a black stone countertop, then antiqued metal or even satin black knobs could help tie the room together. Alternatively, base your color and finish choice on the cabinets themselves: Dark hardware to match dark wood or light hardware as a contrast. Choose more rustic finishes like antiqued or hammered metal to go with traditional cabinetry or go with sleek brushed metal for a more modern look.
Kitchens are often thought of as the heart of a household. We spend a lot of time in our kitchens every day, and they’re usually the backdrop of most social gatherings in our homes. If your kitchen style is beginning to feel outdated and uninspiring, there are a number of quick and easy ways to update your kitchen that will save you the time and expense of a complete kitchen remodel.
If you’re going to paint or re-stain your cabinets now would be a good time to do that. I’m a painted wood kind of gal, so these cabinets got painted, plus it’s a lot quicker and easier to paint them than to sand and re-stain. After the doors and frames have been painted it’s time to install the hinges and the glass. Since my upper, upper cabinets will rarely get used I secured the glass with silicone, if your glass cabinets will get daily use then you might want to use silicone and glazing points. I also put removable frosted film on my glass because after we added puck lights to the upper, uppers I realized how ugly the inside of the cabinets looked.
One of the most popular styles now is lacquered or aged brass. "Ten years ago," Huh says, "it was all about nickel: brushed nickel, shiny nickel. Now it's the resurgence of brass." Designers are using "bold tones, and things that look worn," she says, by installing unlacquered brass that tarnishes over the course of a year, or paying extra for "pre-antiqued" brass that already has a colorful patina.
When exploring kitchen cabinet hardware ideas, your first task should be to decide how closely aligned in terms of style you want your hardware and the cabinets themselves. For example, a traditional Shaker style cabinet can be complemented with simple, understated brushed metal hardware—or it can provide a blank canvas for all manner of creative approaches to door handles and drawer pulls. The choice is yours, and while it's true that sticking with a one-to-one approach with cabinets and hardware may save you time and simplify the design process, exploring other options may allow you to express more of your own design aesthetic in the kitchen.
However, much like the keys of the grand piano, hardware commands the proceedings in cabinetry. It is generally the only part of a cabinet we touch, and its hinges account for all of its moving parts. As it is our main method of interacting with the cabinet, its feel, sturdiness and functionality are going to play a large role in how we view the functionality of the kitchen.
Never underestimate the visual effectiveness of adding just a hint of metallic to a room. These sleek round knobs are a shiny brass, which would glint beautifully in all this kitchen’s natural light. The super-flat front and simple round shape complement the modern design of the other elements. And the brass hue actually echoes the natural wood tone of the stools, warming the room up visually.
Painting cabinets yourself is cost-effective -- a few gallons of paint, sandpaper, cleaner -- but the process is time-intensive. You can paint most cabinet surfaces, but proper prep is key to success. For laminate and melamine finishes, be sure to rough up the surface with 150-grit sandpaper, and apply a good bonding primer before topping it off with the color of your choice.
Recessed Pulls mimic the utilitarian style of traditional office cabinetry. They’re built into the cabinet door and can be crafted from the same material to blend in or a contrasting material to highlight their presence. They’re also great for high-traffic kitchens because they don’t protrude from the doors, meaning there is little risk of them snagging on clothing.
Hanging knobs on a flat-front cabinet is pretty straightforward: You’ll want to position the knob in the bottom corner (for upper cabinets) or top corner (for lower cabinets) of the door. Knobs should be placed equidistant from both sides of the cabinet. A guide like this one can help you to get the measurements right. The exact distance will depend on the look you want and the size of your knobs: Test one or two before you drill a whole kitchen’s worth of holes.
One of the most popular styles now is lacquered or aged brass. "Ten years ago," Huh says, "it was all about nickel: brushed nickel, shiny nickel. Now it's the resurgence of brass." Designers are using "bold tones, and things that look worn," she says, by installing unlacquered brass that tarnishes over the course of a year, or paying extra for "pre-antiqued" brass that already has a colorful patina.
Our drawer pulls come in a nearly endless variety of materials, styles and finishes. For a contemporary, modern look, try a brushed nickel or chrome drawer pull. If you’re considering a more traditional, classic style, check out our bronze, brass, pewter and black drawer pulls. You’ll be amazed by how a small detail like cabinet hardware can change the look of an entire room. Updating kitchen cabinet hardware, or furniture hardware is also a quick and easy exercise that requires few tools, minimal effort, and is relatively inexpensive.
The other option for changing kitchen cabinet knobs is to purchase new ones. The two main types of cabinet fixtures for kitchens are circular pulls and metal bars. The round pulls tend to be old-fashioned, while the metal bar handles are often more contemporary. Cabinet pulls can be made more modern by painting them metallic silver. Metal bar cabinet door handles are usually silver-colored and narrow; this style is often seen with darker wood toned cabinets.
Knikki Grantham is a Trend Manager with over 20 years in the Furniture and in the Furniture and Design Industry. She grew up in the furniture industry with early memories of sawdust and hand tied springs. After working in various phases of furniture production and development she moved into Design Sales for a Luxury high-end retailer, attaining an Associate ASID as well as other accreditations from various furniture manufacturers.
Dreamer, thinker, + lemon squeezer; you'll usually find me clutching a mug of coffee, glue gun, fandeck of paint colors, and a child at any given time. This mom of two (and wife to one) loves to share freshly squeezed ideas for home and family. Join the adventure as we learn most lemons can indeed become lemonade-- with generous amounts of sweetness, perspective, and love.
If you're having trouble selecting the perfect cabinet hardware, for quality and value, you can’t go wrong with a cabinet hardware sample box. The cabinet hardware sample box lets you try out multiple styles and finishes in your home, select the one you love, then visit homedepot.com or your local Home Depot store to purchase the full amount needed.
Below and above the sink can be two different color schemes. Don’t worry, you can mix and match more than you might think and still obey the laws of symmetry. It can provide a sunny, uplifting splash to have a lighter color above the level of the countertops, such as a warm brass or gold. Particularly with items like faucets and sconces, a lighter color around eye level will create a happy glow.
I have the exact hinge you mentioned under the caption “Then there are Overlay Hinges where you can see part of the hinge as well.” My problem is that on the 3 sets of doors we have that have no center stile, the doors are pushed too far toward center, therefore not enough space to close properly. Any suggestions other than taking down the doors and planing them? Hate that option on already completely finished doors. Great informative post.
Hopefully you drilled for the hinges in the same location on every door, if so, then this should be simple. You really just need to measure for the top hinge. I installed my top hinge 4” down from the top of the door, so I measured 3 ½” down from the inside top of the face frame (3 ½” + ½” overlay = 4”). This step is a team effort, one person to hold the door and another person to attach the hinge to the face frame.

At a home renovation in Connecticut, cabinet fabricator Michael Madore experimented with what he calls an "aggressive" metal-sanding process to pull out the grain from the whitewashed oak plywood. For the hardware-free cabinets, Julie Salles Schaffer looked to a drawer pull detail derived from Giò Ponti’s work—though she admits the radial edging is an effect entirely her own.


Cabinet hardware is composed a variety of materials -- most of which are metal alloys. Brass hardware typically has a lacquer or plating applied to its surface that makes it very durable in a kitchen. It is antimicrobial and helps to reduce the spread of germs. Bronze hardware is also antimicrobial, offers a substantial look and feel, and works well for cabinets made of thicker woods. Stainless steel is another option because it is so durable. Pewter and nickel are popular choices, too. Or, you can choose knobs made from glass or crystal for a vintage look. 
Consult with a contractor or a knowledgeable salesperson about which hinges will work with your doors. If your doors are flush with the cabinets, butt hinges can be used. They are lower in price than others but do not self-close. European hinges are installed on full overlay, frameless or inset doors. They are widely used because of their ease of installation and ability to be adjusted once in place. These hinges self-close. Partial wraparound hardware will support larger doors, but it does not self-close. Several other types hinges are available. The construction of your door, ease of installation and price will need to be considered. .
The color white, and more specifically, white colored cabinets, have never been more popular in today’s kitchens. White is always in style, regardless if you have a slick modern kitchen or relaxed country style. With their relaxed style and design flexibility, it’s no secret as to why white cabinets are a constant crowd pleaser. The color white can make a room look larger and timeless in one broad stroke. With white cabinets, hardware is the most crucial detail, as it is more than just an accent, Hardware completes the room and adds overall value to your kitchen. With all of the available options, selecting the perfect hardware for your white cabinets can be a frustrating exercise. Below we discuss what to consider when selecting hardware for white kitchen cabinets.
Custom kitchen cabinetry doesn’t come cheap, but if you’re planning to stay put in your home for a long while, it’s worth spending to get exactly what you want, including the built-ins that enable you to live clutter-free. At the other end of the spectrum, we show you ways to modify Ikea kitchen components for a custom look (we’ve found almost a dozen new companies that offer doors to pair with Ikea’s cabinets).
Aside from polishing, the look of stone hardware is largely in the hands of nature. Though your hardware pieces may all share traits if they come from the same slab of rock, each piece is going to be different. This creates a natural variety in appearance that will add zest to your room. Stone is cool to the touch and looks especially lovely in homes with a woodsy touch.
It’s easy to find interesting kitchen cabinet knobs for theme kitchens due to the wide selection available today. For example, there are colorful fish shaped ceramic knobs for tropical or beach themed kitchens and animal shaped cupboard pulls for a country kitchen theme. Gold colored cabinet knobs work in some kitchens although silver colored handles coordinate better with stainless steel sinks and appliances.
For oversized cabinetry you’ll obviously want to use larger hardware.  Oversized cabinets and drawers are defined as over 3 feet wide. Cookware drawers or built-in appliance cabinetry are usually oversized.  For these large drawers and cabinet doors, consider long pulls which typically come in widths of 6”, 8”, 10” or 12 inches.  Some contemporary pulls are even larger than 12 inches.  That measurement is taken from the center of one screw hole to the center of the second screw hole).  Oversized knobs  are 1-1/2” or larger.
Sometimes brass finishes can be difficult to match since there are so many types (unlacquered, satin, antique, polished, etc.). Generally, you just have to order samples to see everything together. However, I will say that you should stay away from polished brass - it gives a very 80s vibe! Unlacquered brass starts shiny, but has a richer tone that gives a beautiful patina over time. For a more modern brass look, stick with the satin finishes!
The importance of selecting quality hardware is impossible to overstate. As with many parts of our home, hardware is an investment. We have all seen cabinet knobs that loosen too easily and hinges that wear out. Because hardware is going to receive the bulk of a cabinet’s wear and tear, investing more in it is ultimately investing more in the life of your cabinets.
These industrial-feeling pulls are a blend of colonial and Arts and Crafts, and come in a wide variety of finishes. While these black ones are a good choice with the black appliances and lighting, don’t feel your knobs must match all the finishes in your kitchen; it’s OK to mix things up. Just don’t mix the knobs and hinges on the same door; those definitely should be coordinated so one doesn’t detract from the other.
Finally, another popular way of opening cabinets without the use of traditional pulls or knobs is through cut-outs in the cabinetry. These are frequently found on custom cabinets where a minimalist look is desired, or where the budget is tight and saving on hardware is desirable. Cut-outs can come in a range of shapes, and are often designed to facilitate ease of opening. 
The quick answer is yes, you can change the hinges. The hard part is what type. Cabinet doors have lots of different configurations.....full overlay, partial overlay, inset, etc., etc. The hinges have to fit the door style. There are hidden hinges that screw to the cabinet framework without major holes, and there are European type hinges that require a large hole to set the hinge into. Go to big box and look at the hinges, what is available can be mind boggling, until you understand the type of door you have.
Hi Lonnice – I am so happy you found me again. :-) Did you subscribe and then stop getting my posts in your email? I would like to understand what happened if this is the case. Did you need to subscribe again? I did make a few tweaks about 6 months ago to my subscriber list and would like to pinpoint the problem to why you stopped getting the emails in the first place. Thanks for reading :-)
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