Thanks Mary. That is a good question. There is another similar product from DecoArt called Metallic Lustre but I am not sure if it is available in Europe either. (Also, I haven’t used it so I can’t say for sure if I would recommend it.) Also, it isn’t exactly the same but silver spray paint can also work. After cleaning the hinges, spray them with spray primer and then follow up with a spray paint in the metallic finish you want.
Order samples, and get a few different types of styles and sizes to decide what will work best for your cabinet doors. It’s helpful to shop with a sample of your cabinet door. Ask yourself: Does my hand keeps sliding on the grip? Is it difficult to pull or get a grasp on it? Does it get greasy from my fingertips? Would I rather have a pull near the fridge but a knob near the stove? You will use this item a ton of times everyday, and you want to feel comfortable with your choice. There’s nothing worse than a cute knob that’s hard to pull open everyday.
First, you’ll want to do a thorough count of all your doors and drawers to make sure you know exactly how many new pulls and knobs you’ll need. To streamline the project, match your new hardware’s spread to the distance between the existing screw holes (you may need a tape measure). Or you can just take one of the old pulls with you to the store to shop.
Here are the three different kinds of kitchen cabinet doors that demonstrate the different overlays and hinge options.  The first is similar to what I’m working on now – a framed cabinet with an overlay on the cabinet frame.  The second is a framed cabinet where the doors are inset, flush with the cabinet frame.  And the third is a frameless cabinet where hidden hinges are utilized.
You probably noticed from the after photo that I didn’t just replace the hinges and add glass, oh no, I went big with this transformation. I replaced the hinges, added glass to the upper, upper cabinets, removed the wood valances, closed in a window and added open shelving (super simple), added upper and under cabinet lighting, new counter tops, new back splash and new appliances.  But I did all that with the original cabinets and they no longer look tired, worn out or dated. Now if I could just find something to renovate my tired, worn out, dated self…
Often, the hardest part in updating your kitchen hardware is deciding what will look best in your kitchen. The installation can be a simple DIY that will likely take less than two hours. However, if your kitchen cabinet hardware requires more than just a few screws but rather new fittings on your cabinets or drawers, contact a pro to ensure all of your new hardware fits perfectly.
Modern cabinet door hinges are a critical part to any cabinet, and are also quite complex; there are about a dozen (if not more) different types of hinges, depending on whether you have face-frame cabinets or frameless cabinets. Face-frame cabinets include a frame made of 1-½" to 2" wide solid wood that attaches to the front edges of the cabinets. This type of cabinet construction is common in American-made cabinets, and hinges will then mount directly to this frame. However, if you have frameless cabinets—which are typically made in Europe, like IKEA cabinets—your cabinets are basically just a four-sided box with no frame around the front edges. In this case, the hinges will mount directly to the interior of the cabinet. 
First, you’ll want to do a thorough count of all your doors and drawers to make sure you know exactly how many new pulls and knobs you’ll need. To streamline the project, match your new hardware’s spread to the distance between the existing screw holes (you may need a tape measure). Or you can just take one of the old pulls with you to the store to shop.
These industrial-feeling pulls are a blend of colonial and Arts and Crafts, and come in a wide variety of finishes. While these black ones are a good choice with the black appliances and lighting, don’t feel your knobs must match all the finishes in your kitchen; it’s OK to mix things up. Just don’t mix the knobs and hinges on the same door; those definitely should be coordinated so one doesn’t detract from the other.
A common choice is to use knobs for all drawers and pulls for all doors (or vice versa). The problem with knobs is they are harder to grip and fingernails tend to mar the cabinet door. It is much more comfortable to open a drawer using a pull, which allows the whole hand to grab instead of only your fingertips. We generally use pulls (no nobs whatsoever) in our kitchen designs.  

Apparently I would use MP(?) kind of boards (I forget what the man at HD called it) and it costs about $25 for an 8x4 sheet. I would just measure my cupboard doors, then go in and tell them the measurements, and they would do all the cutting. Then I would just prime the boards, then paint them, then pre-drill the holes for the new hinges, then put them up.
My go-to shop for all of my hardware needs is D.Lawless Hardware – I’ve been using hardware from there for a while now and it’s always the best quality at the lowest prices. They sell so many other awesome products too. Everything from knobs and pulls, drawer slides and systems, to wood appliques, trim, DIY, craft supplies, outlet covers, and so much more! 
I am thinking of doing similar here but can’t find the Harbor Freight Brad Nailer he used (electric as I am not gonna drag the huge air compressor to this house from our shop!) And some of the reviews I have seen on other brad nailers have been less than confidence inspiring! Any suggestions as to a decent plug-in nailer—don’t need the “staple” function JUST the nails!
Hello Mr. TretheweyMy name is terry cotto, when we built our beautiful home 16 years ago, in Sierra Madre Ca I had my claw tub installed,( my child hood remembrance) It appears, that the claw legs of the tub were not installed properly, and one leg fell off , tub was slightly tipping to the right. I had a handyman come over and reinstall the claw legs, tighten so this would not happen again. The other day, while I was bathing I noticed the seal of the drain on the outside rubber was not laying properly, plus it was leaking, ( I think this was due to the leg falling off and unbalancing the ring. Well, now I really don't know what to do about that. I believe the thing to do is remove the cover off the top drain , ok, but than what do I have to move the claw tub, impossible. How do I replace the rubber of the outside of the top drain pipe, it appears to be brittle. (Not good)Please answer my questions, and I will hire the handy man again to help me. Thank you. I have learned so much from T.O.H weekly shows, I am a loyal fan at 75. I tell my 80 year old husband, you need to watch these shows with me, and we can do it ourselves, the right way. God Bless you all for the great job your doing, I need to know how to do it right, so it doesn't happen again. a picture would be good, I can see exactly how its done?
Picking the perfect cabinets for a project is hard enough, but the effort it takes to research, test and finally decide on the best piece of outward-facing cabinet hardware calls for even further inspection. While the main material for the cabinet door heavily contributes to a kitchen’s character, its hardware serves to accentuate that character further still. A key detail within one of the most important spaces of a residence, cabinet hardware sits squarely at the intersection of form and function, and making the right choice here can elevate the design of the entire kitchen.

For customers who have homes near the ocean, Cliffside recommends choosing non-metal items such as marble or wood for your projects. Salt air acts as an abrasive, and quickly erodes the lacquer coating. If you absolutely need (or desire) metal hardware, Cliffside recommends solid stainless steel, or certain solid brass finishes such as Black, Polished Brass, or Polished Chrome. Note that, even in optimum indoor conditions, no Cliffside finish has a lifetime guarantee under any circumstances.
If your old fridge still runs like a champ on the inside but it’s starting to look like a but run-down and haggard on the outside, spruce it up with a DIY custom cover! Appliance covers are fastened directly to the outside of your appliance, masking their appearance on the outside and making them blend in with your kitchen cabinetry. You can take materials like bead board paneling, wallpaper, wood from old pallets or even mismatched wood scraps from barns to create an interesting look for your old appliance.
It's something you could DIY if you wanted to invest the time and energy into it, but I know my strengths and weaknesses. ;-). This sweet, retired woodworker, is charging $300-$400 to drill the holes in the cabinets, provide the hinges, and rehang them (all 23 of them), so I'm feeling like it's a pretty good deal, and the homeowner agrees! I'm really excited to see the finished look!
Hinges creak, wear out, discolor or even break over the years. They can also bend. This makes cabinet doors fit poorly. New hinges can update any set of cabinet doors no matter how old they are, and real estate agents often recommend replacing old hardware to help sell your home. Whether you're moving, doing a remodeling job or your kitchen just needs a bit of TLC, you can change your hinges out in one afternoon. Hinges are designed to fit square on the side of the door, making it simple to get the hinge alignment correct -- even if your doors are older than you are.
Sandra, I’m so glad that I came across your blog! You’ve given so much great information that I can use every day in my job doing kitchen cabinet sales. And then there’s the whole DIY part for me personally! I’m really hoping that you can answer my question, though. I have a customer who is refacing her cabinets. She has frameless cabinets and used to have exposed hinges. She wanted concealed hinges so we had the hinge holes drilled 1″ (center) from the edge. She has her new doors but when she hangs them, there’s a 1/4″ gap between the door and center stile, even after adjusting them. We were using full overlay hinges. Can you advise which type of overlay hinge to use and how to rectify the gap? Thanks so much!
Knikki Grantham is a Trend Manager with over 20 years in the Furniture and in the Furniture and Design Industry. She grew up in the furniture industry with early memories of sawdust and hand tied springs. After working in various phases of furniture production and development she moved into Design Sales for a Luxury high-end retailer, attaining an Associate ASID as well as other accreditations from various furniture manufacturers.
It's easy to overlook cabinet handles when you're remodeling your kitchen or building a new home. After all, they're fairly small, easy to install and don't cost as much as, say, a refrigerator or new cabinets. Nevertheless, cabinet handles, also called cabinet pulls, and their near kin, cabinet knobs, can make a big difference in the look and utility of your kitchen. You use your cabinet hardware dozens of times a day, and while hardware like cabinet hinges are not highly visible, kitchen cabinet handles are high profile and can add to or detract from the look of your kitchen, depending on how carefully you choose your kitchen cabinet knobs and handles. Keep reading for information on how to choose cabinet handles that will help give your kitchen the look you want.
Although kitchen cabinet knobs are small objects, keep in mind that one on each cupboard door creates an overall design impact. Further impact can be created by choosing cabinet knobs that contrast in color and texture with the cabinets. If less impact is desired, cabinet knobs may be made of the same material and in the same color as the kitchen cabinets. The most important thing to remember when choosing cabinet knobs to coordinate with cabinets is to keep the kitchen’s overall tone in mind, whether it’s country, elegant, whimsical or traditional.
Eight staircases?!?Nothing says 'stupid' quite as much as that!Not being critical of the crew, but between the 'historical society' that dictates what you can and can't do (but happily send you the bill) and over the top designs that will prove to be idiotic just makes me shake my head in disbelief.This certainly won't be a house where you can 'age in place'.
Eight staircases?!?Nothing says 'stupid' quite as much as that!Not being critical of the crew, but between the 'historical society' that dictates what you can and can't do (but happily send you the bill) and over the top designs that will prove to be idiotic just makes me shake my head in disbelief.This certainly won't be a house where you can 'age in place'.
I love to see your work in progress! And I agree that the wood valance over the window looks so much better painted white, you almost don’t see it now. Funny story, I had a similar valance in my last house and as part of my kitchen refresh, I had the contractor knock that out and oh what a difference it made! I had only 1 tiny window in the kitchen and that stinking valance blocked so much light. Your home is much more open and bright with all the white now, thanks for sharing! You’re in the home stretch now!!
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